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William Shatner Answers, in 826 Words

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the time-and-space-mean-nothing-and-everything dept.

Books 189

You asked William Shatner questions, and Shatner replied. It's not the first time he's answered questions for Slashdot (that was in 2002), but Shatner's given a bit more insight this time into what makes an 80-year-old actor-author-sportsman-father-filmmaker tick as fast as ever. Did he mention that he's got a one-man show about to open? And a new album? Note: Typically Shatner, he's also chosen to ignore (or transcend) the usual Slashdot interview structure, and written his answers in his own style, which is why the format looks a little different from most of our interviews. Thanks, Bill. (Read on for his answers.)

How has technology changed acting for you?
by wired_parrot

TV and movie productions have become more technically elaborate over the years, evolving from what were essentially filmed theatrical productions, to elaborate and technically demanding productions that require a large industry of people to support it. In your view, how has technology changed the role and experience of acting since you started?

Do you think young actors today have it easier?
by elrous0

In your early days, there were only a few major television networks, and it was much more difficult to move back and forth between television and movies. Today, with so many cable shows, the internet, and with actors moving much more freely between movies and television, do you think young actors have it easier? Or do you think that the proliferation of reality television and the "noise" of so many channels/series has actually made things harder for scripted actors?

The cerebral characters you've played vs. pure action heroes?
by jd

Are there times you wish you'd had a quieter, more sedate career like, say, Roger Moore or Bruce Lee, or is there a part of you that craves the geekier, more cerebral hero roles you've played?

Uniforms
by milbournosphere

Mr. Shatner: I recently watched my way through The Original Series and you were constantly pulling your uniform shirt down. I've also heard that the red uniforms from the movies were quite cumbersome to design and wear. Which was more uncomfortable to you, the uniforms from the original television episodes or the red command uniforms from the movies?

Favorite non-Star Trek roles?
by loftwyr

Outside of the Star Trek series, you've had a large number of regular, one-off and recurring roles. What would be your favorite role prior to the beginnings of Star Trek and after the original ST series run? If different, what was your favourite one-off?

Boston Legal
by gurps_npc

You seemed to have a great relationship with Mr. Spader - was that all fantastic acting, or did you become friends - as in you still see/speak with him even after the show ended?

Do you still practice archery?
by WillAdams

(Back in 1995 or so you were still noted as an archer and had been for quite a while.)

If so, how often, using what equipment? Still using a compound or have you gone back to using a recurve or longbow? If you do still shoot, do you travel w/ your archery gear? Any issues in doing so? Or amusing anecdotes?

Tek and a vision of the future
by The Bastard

Mr. Shatner, it's been 22 years since TekWar was first published; seventeen since the television series gave us a "common" visualization of Tek itself. Since those two milestones, I've found it intriguing how our technological advancement seems to be aiming towards the development of Tek. And not just advancement with computers and the Internet, but within the neuroscience and brain-computer interface fields also. It is within the realm of possibility that Tek--or similar digital drug--will exist within a couple of decades.

Could you talk about how the concept of Tek came about? Was it just a "crazy idea" that hit you while riding one of your horses, or did you sit down by yourself or others to develop a vision of the future and build a story around that? Also, looking around at people addicted to using smartphones everywhere, what are your thoughts regarding a form of Tek coming into existence in the next decade or two?

The Captains
by doramjan

Do you have any insights from your interviews with the other Captions from the documentary The Captains that didn't make the cut? Please share, if so. I found that documentary fascinating and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Henry Rollins
by mrmud

Henry Rollins tells a great and funny story about working with you on a musical project. What is your perspective on the story?

Commodore VIC-20
by GIL_Dude

When I was a kid, your commercial for the Commodore VIC-20 convinced me that I had to have one (because Captain Kirk was advertising it!). I used it to learn some programming (both BASIC and assembler) and it was the early foundation for what I do today. The question: Did you actually use one of them day to day or was it just something they hired you to advertise and they gave you one and it sat in the corner?

Canadian politics?
by kabrakan

You've jested about this in the past, but do you have any thoughts on running for a political seat in the Canadian government? We'd love to have you (but hey, anyone can do better than the current guy in the top seat).

Inspiring the next generation?
by techmuse

Growing up, Star Trek was one of the things that got me interested in engineering and the sciences. It made me want to see the future, or create it myself. What do you think should be done to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers?

The growing "anti-smart" person culture
by PotatoHead

There is a growing "anti-smart" person culture out there now. When you were playing Kirk, kids could get a real chemistry set, for example. Now it's a lot different, and that desire to "boldly go where no man has gone before" seems blunted, constrained and discouraged. Much better to play in the sand box with the other kids.

When you were playing Kirk, I was a free range kid doing all manner of things, and yes that includes blowing stuff up. Now free range kids are increasingly rare as we consider that bad parenting, or they are "at risk," or some other fear based thing. Have you noticed these changes? What do you think about them?

Mortality?
by optimism

Mr. Shatner: Recently I saw you in the Raymond Kurzweil documentary Transcendant Man, where you emphatically said that you do not want to die. This year, you have exceeded the average life expectancy of a male for ANY country in the world. Iceland is highest at 80.2 years; you are now 80.5 years.

So my question(s): Are you still fighting the battle for physical/mental immortality? If so, how? If not, can you describe the process you have gone through to accept your mortality and ultimately death?

Cxu vi ankoraux estas Esperantisto?
by Yekrats

Bill, you're well known in the Esperanto world as the star of the pre-Star Trek thriller Incubus, written and performed in Esperanto.

Cxu vi ankoraux regas vian Esperanto-kapablon de tiu filmo? (Have you still retained your Esperanto ability from that movie?)

Cxu vi uzis gxin iel ajn poste? (Have you used it an any way afterwards?)

Shuttle Enterprise
by wideBlueSkies

Mr Shatner, can you share what your thoughts were when you found out that NASA decided to name the 1st shuttle as The Enterprise? Can you offer any insights into the general thoughts of the rest of the cast or Gene himself? How was it for you, knowing that part of the show had such an influence on that segment of the world, meaning the fans and the space community, that they actually honored the show by naming a real spacecraft after it?

Also, how the hell did you get mixed up with the Charlie Sheen roast? You're the last guy I expected to see... but your "who's the warlock now? Bitch" was indeed the highlight of the night.

Will you ever tour?
by buanzo

Mr Shatner, It's an honor to at least have the chance of asking you something. Thank you for your time. And for everything. Have you considered touring, as a stand-up comedian or whatever, specially outside U.S. and Canada? You know, you have a gigantic fanbase in, ehem, Argentina.

William Shatner replies:

Performing a role is always the same. You take a deep breath, you speak words, you hit marks, and you listen to what other people say. What has changed is the amount of light that is necessary to get your image on film — which by now is candlelight. So that it’s not any harder and certainly not any easier to be an actor. Yes, there is more need for content, but so much of that content doesn't require experience, talent, the ability to speak English or in fact, the ability to stand upright (e.g. The Jersey Shore). There is a great deal of fun in doing stunts. It makes for a lot of physical activity. You have to remember to do your pushups but sitting in a chair and talking about how you feel is also entertainment, at least for the actor. Now if you have a thinking man’s action hero, that would be ideal.

Wardrobe is certainly a consideration in many instances. It is possible to be beautifully dressed and to be your character especially if you get to keep the expensive wardrobe. The Star Trek wardrobes were made of stretch material so if your lunch was more than bread and water, you had to keep pulling those shirts down because they tended to ride up.

I don't think of favorite roles like 'This was my favorite thing to do, and that isn’t.' I just wish they hadn't cancelled Shit My Dad Says because I could bicycle to work.

It’s best to be friendly with the people you are working with and that goes for everything including acting. If you dislike a person and you have to say 'I love you,' it certainly makes things difficult. I have remained friends with most of the people I have worked with through the years.

Right now I am working on my new album, Seeking Major Tom, my new book, Shatner Rules, a new DVD of the documentary The Captains, and I want all you people in Canada to come to my one man show that starts on October 19th in Vancouver and goes through to Montreal a couple of weeks later, in between, visiting all the major cities.

I am involved in many sports. I think of myself as an athlete. But instead of archery these days I am competing on horseback and I am having just as much fun.

When I wrote Tek Wars, there was a strike that prevented us from working on a movie so I built a detective story of the future. I love to watch TV and it seemed to me that was the drug of the future and low and behold, you can't tell the color of peoples' eyes anymore because they are looking down fixated on their texting.

I enjoyed making The Captains tremendously. The insights garnered from the various actors and my own epiphany I thought made an interesting film. It can seen October 20th on Movie Central in Canada at 9pm MT/8PT and the DVD can be purchased on the United States only right now (as of October 18th).

I have a new album out called Seeking Major Tom and to my great disappointment, Henry Rollins is not on it, otherwise [would] have had another funny story to tell about working with me.

I used to try to assemble computers way back when and they came out looking like a skateboard. I soon gave it up.

There's a large group of people who want me to be the Governor General but other than throwing a party for the king and queen, I don't know what else he does.

Star Trek helped inspire a whole generation of scientists and engineers with the magic of today's electronics I would think people of all kinds would try to find ways of working with around about computers and I also think that with the NASA program put on hold, it is a shame that we can't inspire the younger generation that way.

Death is increasingly fascinating to me the closer I get to it and if I could reach Kurzweil's Singularity, I would don the Iron Man's suit although come to think of it, how do you sleep? Do you sleep on your back? But since that is not possible, I live in a balancing act of terror and acceptance every day.

If anyone asks you to star in a movie shot entirely in Esperanto, say 'Kiam Kaj Kiel Multa?'

In the documentary The Captains, I meet all the actors and share heartfelt thoughts about what it took to do the series. How proud we all are of being in the show and Star Trek’s place in our culture. By the way, did I mention how you can get a DVD of The Captains? Amazon.com.

I had the best time at the Charlie Sheen Roast which I incorporate into my one man show which opens October 19th. Did I mention that earlier?

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Show me the money (5, Informative)

alphatel (1450715) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741014)

For those weak on Esperanto, "Kiam Kaj Kiel Multa" means When and how much! [kafejo.com]

Re:Show me the money (1)

ThorGod (456163) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741168)

Robert Plant did a similar thing. People have their flaws...

Re:Show me the money (1)

ThorGod (456163) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741190)

crud ment to reply to next post...

Re:Show me the money (1)

Chapter80 (926879) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741306)

For those weak on Esperanto, "Kiam Kaj Kiel Multa" means When and how much! [kafejo.com]

But more importantly, what does it mean for those strong on Esperanto?

Re:Show me the money (1)

pinfall (2430412) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741484)

It means pay me and I will do your bidding.

Re:Show me the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37742100)

But more importantly, what does it mean for those strong on Esperanto?

That Shatner's Esperanto is weak.

Re:Show me the money (3, Funny)

vaene (1981644) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741824)

For those who are not weak! in Klingon: ghorgh 'ej chay' 'ar!

Shatner died for me when... (0, Troll)

MindPrison (864299) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741142)

...he called his fanbase a bunch of geeks who ought to get a life, live on TV.

http://starshiptim.com/shatner.html [starshiptim.com]

I've never truly been a trekkie myself, but I loved the series Shatner was a leading part of, and I used to watch it on TV whenever I could find the time to do so, but later on, when I heard (on CNN) that Shatner just thought that Trekkies (essentially his BIGGEST FANS) ought to get a life...then I was thinking, this is a man who doesn't appreciate all the good things his fans have given him (such as a surefire success to millions of dollars), sure...what he does with his money is his business, fair game...but calling his fans a bunch of geeks that needs to get a life, is a TAD bit overboard imho!

It's not like his life is 100% perfect either, look, he loves to eat...yes ...no secret there, he's gone from 70 to over 100kgs faster than lightspeed, from a thin healthy man to a huge fat self absorbent fan-hater that now even has his own show, based entirely on his own previous fame (sh@t my dad says)...which have failed severely here in Scandinavia...because ...seriously...what does a fat Shatner have that any other has-been hollywood actor can't offer in a sit com?

Shatner, you used to be cool...but I've lost all respect for you. You fans is what made you big in the first time, now ...you're just "big".

Re:Shatner died for me when... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741206)

I, no the other hand, respect him for having the balls to speak his mind, instead of living inside the artificial PR bubble. He's one of the few who's a genuine person instead of a teleprompted bobblehead.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741212)

qq much?

Re:Shatner died for me when... (4, Insightful)

phorm (591458) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741250)

Given what I've seen of many hardcore fans, it's not terrible advice. You can be a fan *and* still a semi-normal person, but some of the fans take things to extremes and/or seem to have lost track of reality along the way.

semi-normal (1)

Anomalyst (742352) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741402)

semi-normal

Sounds like a great idea for a new reality series.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (3, Funny)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741494)

I took his advice, and got a life. (Well as much of a life as any geek can hope to have.)

I still think I enjoyed Star Trek more. :)

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742050)

Given what I've seen of many hardcore fans, it's not terrible advice. You can be a fan *and* still a semi-normal person, but some of the fans take things to extremes and/or seem to have lost track of reality along the way.

Case in point the prospective juror wearing a Star Trek uniform. That was an uncomfortable moment and I don't even consider myself remotely hardcore Trekkie.

"Uh, no, people who like to watch Star Trek shows are not all like that."

Re:Shatner died for me when... (4, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741272)

Never assume that people who obsess over a show are really "the biggest fans". Think, for example, of the recent show Lost where the fans that the network really depended on were fairly casual TV viewers (and thus the increasing emphasis on the love triangle over more substantial plot elements), not the comparatively smaller group of people who discussed the show's mythology on internet fora and spent every waking hour trying to solve its mysteries.

One can see Star Trek in the same light. True, those embarrassing nerds who play dress up might have kept the franchise on life support during the years between the first two series, but ultimately the success of Star Trek was due to masses of relatively normal people, not the overweight slobs with no social skills that Shatner was addressing.

Those fans could have "gotten a life" and continued watching the show. They just didn't have to continue their bizarre behaviour.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

MindPrison (864299) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741630)

What's bizzarre about loving something too much?

I can understand if you're an idiot going overboard by visiting some actors house, stalking them and stuff...then you're a freaking nutcase, granted!

But people, gathering together...to enjoy their series? What's nuts about that? HOW exactly do you need to spit at your fanbase by calling them a bunch of geeks that ought to get a life?

From a business point of view, that has got to be the dumbest thing you could ever do to your customer base.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

flaming error (1041742) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741872)

> do you need to spit at your fanbase by calling them a
> bunch of geeks that ought to get a life?

Most people that heard that just nodded their head or laughed and went on with their life.

Probably few were offended much besides the ones for whom it rang true. Shatner apparently thought they could find a more meaningful life in reality.

So sue him, at the United Federation of Planets. I'd go with a klingon judge - any power trekkie speaks klingon.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (4, Insightful)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741954)

What's bizzarre about loving something too much?

What's bizarre about eating too much?
What's bizarre about smoking too much?
What's bizarre about exercising too much?
What's bizarre about masturbating too much?

I'm pretty sure it's the "too much" part.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742576)

In my opinion, absolutely nothing.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741712)

Never assume that people who obsess over a show are really "the biggest fans". Think, for example, of the recent show Lost where the fans that the network really depended on were fairly casual TV viewers (and thus the increasing emphasis on the love triangle over more substantial plot elements), not the comparatively smaller group of people who discussed the show's mythology on internet fora and spent every waking hour trying to solve its mysteries.

I believe you're mixing "biggest" and "most numerous". The casual Joes and Janes who said "WTF is up with this weird unexplained stuff?" wouldn't be the "biggest" fans. They were numerous, and were the biggest grouping, but were not the most interested fans (they're not the type to buy the DVDs later; water it down too much, and no one buys the DVDs).

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742064)

Think, for example, of the recent show Lost where the fans that the network really depended on were fairly casual TV viewers (and thus the increasing emphasis on the love triangle over more substantial plot elements), not the comparatively smaller group of people who discussed the show's mythology on internet fora and spent every waking hour trying to solve its mysteries.

I understand going for the biggest possible market, but when every series is going for the same thing and all the rest just becomes an angle to tell another love story it gets way overdone. If you just can't have a show that's for the fans of that genre without trying to making another pass at turning it into a romance then you have to force it in there somewhere. I guess sometimes you can do it tastefully, other times not so much.

To take one example, read the Lord of the Rings. After you've read it, ask yourself how large a part of the story is Aragon and Arwen's love story of the book. Yes, I know it's a little bit in the appendix but seriously, in the movies it's the second main plot with Romeo & Juliet'ish proportions, parallel to the LotR plot. It's obviously well done, but that's the way it has to be these days. Unless it's a children's movie (and even then there's Wall-E) there absolutely must be some kind of romantic entanglement.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (2, Interesting)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741284)

Lionizing William Shatner as a hero is dumb. You deserve what you get - and indeed, Trekkies were huge losers, at least when I hung out with them. William Shatner is an actor, and actors aren't exactly known for shining intellects. Look how many of them fall for cults like Scientology or various scientific frauds. Acting is all about feeling, which is pretty much the polar opposite of thinking.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741288)

calling his fans a bunch of geeks that needs to get a life, is a TAD bit overboard imho!

Get a fucking life! The guys an actor and star trek was a silly series than ran for 3 seasons nearly half a century ago.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741332)

Wasn't the "get a life" comment on SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE - as PART OF A SKIT??

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

J Story (30227) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741606)

I remember seeing that. It seems that /. is filled with ankle-biters these days.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741864)

Wasn't the "get a life" comment on SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE - as PART OF A SKIT??

Are you saying that Sarah Palin can't see Romulus from her house?

Re:Shatner died for me when... (3, Insightful)

Trilkin (2042026) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741920)

I was, but it also were Shatner's actual feelings on the subject as well. He felt, at the time the show was canceled, that the people nerding out over it at conventions were a bit obsessive and creepy. I guess to him, the entire thing looked like a relationship that ended and the ex was still stalking him. If I had that mindset, I'd find it a bit creepy too.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (4, Informative)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741354)

So have you ... I don't know, *read* that review? (Or dare I ask -- the book?) Seems to me what he did was kind of the complete opposite of your interpretation of a single remark.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741366)

Trekkies didn't give him that. The vast worldwide public who enjoyed Star Trek as a piece of TV entertainment gave him all that. Trekkies are a tiny number of people who made no difference to Shatner's career at all. He doesn't need to live up to your ideals of how a geek icon should behave, because he never asked for it. If you make up unrealistic expectations for someone, you should not be surprised and throw your toys out of the pram when they do not live up to them.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (5, Insightful)

bennomatic (691188) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741368)

You know, of course, that name-calling was on Saturday Night Live, a comedy show. It was a comedy sketch, and while I'm sure there was more than a grain of truth in the sentiment, it was also quite funny, as it was meant to be. Best line? "You! Have you ever kissed a girl?"

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741392)

“Shatner, you used to be cool...but I've lost all respect for you.”

I never had any respect for you in the first place, MindPrison, now I have even less.

Captcha humor: the secret word for this post was “subset.”

Re:Shatner died for me when... (2)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741450)

Get a life, man.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741528)

You might want to watch his TV special "The Captains". In it, he embraced his inner Captain.

BTW it must suck being typecasted. I know I would hate it too. I'm glad though that shatners gotten over it. I wouldn't have, fuck those geeks.

And shatner is an actor. I blame the writers for that shitty sitcom. Probably got them from madTV.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741534)

Take the advice, man.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741538)

That's funny. I never liked or disliked Shatner one way or the other until he said that. In jest or not, I then realized that the guy had a clear view of what was real life and what was silly obsession. Good for him!

Re:Shatner died for me when... (4, Interesting)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741550)

Speaking as a Trekkie with a few hundred Star Trek books and who considered the characters from the original series to be personal role models, let me be the first to say he was right, and any person who cannot find the humor in his perspective is not socialized nor actualized enough to be wholly functional.

And, really? Picking on him for his weight, or taking a bad role to pay his bills? Let me break it to you, most old men get fat. You try exercising on top of decades old joints in pain. And as bad as Shit My Dad Says was, it wasn't the Shat's fault. The producers watered that whole concept way down to the point where anybody in that role would have failed. I don't blame him for getting paid, it would have been either him or somebody else taking money to participate in that shit series. Old men are also practical, and life isn't free.

Grow a thicker skin, learn to laugh at yourself, and don't pretend everything has to be perfect serious art in order to consider an artist a success. I still admire William Shatner because he lives his life honestly. He doesn't make excuses or hide behind false pleasantries and political niceties (which would have made him great for Shit My Dad Says if the writing wasn't nauseatingly stupid horrible). He's not a great actor, he's an evocative person, and he's himself in his roles, so you feel a human connection with his characterizations, limited though they are.

He's no messiah, but I maintain he's still a cool guy.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742210)

And as bad as Shit My Dad Says was, it wasn't the Shat's fault.

Duuude, they should have named it "Shit the Shat Shot"

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

flaming error (1041742) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741566)

Yeah. Shame on him for speaking the cold hard truth to his best friends. A real friend always kowtows and panders.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741574)

Is it really his fault that his comment hit so close to home?

Re:Shatner died for me when... (2)

Parafilmus (107866) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741656)

...he called his fanbase a bunch of geeks who ought to get a life, live on TV.

Saturday Night Live is a scripted comedy show. You understand that, right?

I saw that episode. It was funny. Shatner didn't insult his fans. He was playing a role, making fun of himself more than anyone else.

(And besides, as he clearly explains in the episode, those hurtful comments were made by the evil captain kirk from "the enemy within.")

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x930vt_william-shatner-snl-skit-get-a-life_fun [dailymotion.com]

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741674)

The man's 80 years old for gods sake.... if he wants to eat, let him. The reality of what he said and the group whom he was referring to, are a bunch of shut-in, anti-social, loser, no life nerds. You can be a fan of something and still have a life. I'm a star wars geek, I play video games, and work on computers for a living.... typical nerd, right? Say that after you see my firearms which I do know how to maintain, use, am well trained to use, and practice with. Throw in the fact that I can perform light gunsmithing, as well as fish, hunt, camp.... typical outdoorsy crap..... While I'm at it, I'll throw the fact that I'm grossly overweight and legally disabled. Quit with the qqing and get a freakin life. I'm sorry that you lost respect for one of the few actors that actually are intelligent, but there's nothing I can do about it...

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

phoenix_rizzen (256998) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741698)

You do realise that "Shit by Dad Says" has absolutely 0 to do with Shatner's life, right? That it's based entirely on the book by the same name? And that the book is semi-auto-biographical, as the author actually lives with his dad, and those are the things that his dad said to him?

You do also realise that at a later Trek convention, Shatner recanted, and has come to approve of his Trek fans way-of-life, and to even revel in all the wonders of Trek conventions? If not, maybe you should read his books.

The fact you would judge a man based on one single act, and then never look into it further (especially considering that even took place some 30-odd years ago), says a lot more about you than about him.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741704)

I agree with Shatner though.

Back when I was in university, there was a fan who would recite episodes (reruns) word for word as the episode was showing on TV, doing a vulcan salute. Yes good you memorized the entire series and more, now sit down, watch the rerun and get a life!

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741708)

Yeah, and it was hilarious [youtube.com] . But don't worry, that part where he made fun of his fan base, that was just a recreation of the Evil Captain Kirk, from episode 37, the Enemy Within. Don't be tricked! You were clearly overcome by his good acting.

About respect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741730)

I am puzzled. You might be correct in every respect (no pun intented). Maybe he shouldn't have said that. Personally I don't care.

So you complain about lack of respect towards his fanbase. You care much about respect, don't you? Why can't I see any kind of respect in your words, not the slightest respect for another person, be it Shatner or not?

Did he really touch you that deep? Get a life!

cb

Re:Shatner died for me when... (5, Insightful)

Schnapple (262314) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741910)

Besides the fact that you're singling him out for a joke skit decades ago which was written by someone else, I guess you've missed the part where, in the years since, Shatner wrote a book also called Get a Life! [amazon.com] where he explains the skit and comes to grip with Star Trek culture. Or the dozens of things he's done since then including create a documentary about Star Trek captains [imdb.com] .

People hate to be typecast. Hell, look at Leonard Nimoy who published a book called I Am Not Spock [wikipedia.org] and then years later another book called I Am Spock [wikipedia.org] .

I don't think it's humanly possible to miss the point and not get the joke any harder than you have in this instance.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37742242)

Dude, read the article you linked to. It explains the origins of his comment, and how he has grown since then to better understand his fans. It's actually a pretty interesting read, and should result in your respect being restored.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742262)

The only people who are offended by that line are the people it applies to.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742302)

And he was right. Trekkies needed that injection of realism, and it couldnt have come from a better source. That was a real moment, and im so very glad he did it. It made him a human being in our eyes again. Your lack of respect for a man whose body of work reaches MILLIONS of people DAILY even now is quite frankly astonishing. 40+ years of TV and most of it still fucking airs. Right now at least 10,000 people are watching Shatner doing something and they are being entertained by it. Fuck you.

Re:Shatner died for me when... (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742708)

You were offended (I magically know this). Therefore, it's true. You need to get a life.

Much like how you can tell if someone is a homosexual if you call them one and they get offended (and if they're not one already, they magically turn into one).

826 words.. (3, Funny)

batquux (323697) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741222)

With a dramatic pause after every 2nd or 3rd word.

Re:826 words.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741344)

I was going to post:

FIIIIIIIIIIIIRRRRRRRRRRRSSSSSSSSSSSSSTTTTTTTTTT PPPPPPPPPPPPPPOOOOOOOOOOOSSSSSSSSSSSTTTTTTTTTTTT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Ala ST2:WofK. But I'm too late.

I see that wasn't in the questions, i.e., what's with the perhaps over-the-top acting style. I don't mind it myself, look at Richard Burton for instance.

Re:826 words.. (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741512)

With a dramatic pause after every 2nd or 3rd word.

I *SO* wanted that question asked, but it appears it didn't make the cut.

Re:826 words.. (1)

Genom (3868) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742102)

They actually had him on the local morning radio last week (or was it the week before?) plugging his new album, and they asked him about it.

He basically said that he's aware of the trope, but that he doesn't feel like he talks like that. Whether that was a canned response for the radio, the honest truth, or something in between is open for debate =)

Re:826 words.. (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742134)

Whether that was a canned response for the radio, the honest truth, or something in between is open for debate =)

That was exactly the question I submitted. Good to know I'm not crazy and alone with that curiosity. :)

Shatner making a new album? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741256)

Where did i put the only working phaser ever built?
It's time to fire it once more.

Re:Shatner making a new album? (2)

black6host (469985) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741544)

I actually found "Has Been" a rather enjoyable listen. Very funny in many places and he had some good musicians working with him. See:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Has_Been/ [wikipedia.org] for details. Doesn't really matter in the end though, cause we're all gonna die :)

Re:Shatner making a new album? (2)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741878)

Yeah, Has Been's on my regular rotation on iPod. It's a really good album. Reminds me of Warren Zevon, with some of the personal depth it has, as well as the humor. Will be interesting to see how new album stacks up.

Thought his comment on death was very interesting: Death is increasingly fascinating to me the closer I get to it... I live in a balancing act of terror and acceptance every day.

I'm in my 40's and yeah, it's starting to hit me that I likely have less years left than have already passed. Mortality is weird!

Funny... (1)

mholve (1101) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741292)

I thought... There'd be... A lot more periods. In this reply?

Translate? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741296)

Somebody already translated the Esperanto. Now translate this please:

I used to try to assemble computers way back when and they came out looking like a skateboard.

If its a noob thing, then its a pre-1981 noob thing because that's when I got started in computing... Some kind of weird S-100 CPM reference to 8 inch disks? I never got Amiga disease so it might be an Amiga thing?

Re:Translate? (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741424)

Dunno, but it's the funniest thing he said. Don't remember the S-100 cards looking like skateboards, but you could make a pretty cool hamster house out of them.

Re:Translate? (2)

operagost (62405) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741552)

You're on the right track. People used to build kit computers in wooden boxes, or even just a small sheet of plywood. I'm sure he didn't mount any trucks on his computer, but it probably did look like a deck. Take a look at a pic of one of the assembled Apple I kits for an example.

Re:Translate? (3, Insightful)

dohnut (189348) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741808)

I am sure he meant that he tried to build a computer and it came out looking like something that does not resemble a computer. Instead of saying, "something that does not resemble a computer," he said, "skateboard." In other words, he was intimating that he sucked at it.

Re:Translate? (2)

History's Coming To (1059484) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741862)

That's the point I think. You and I, we have a rough idea of hardware architecture and where everything should go, so we actually have difficulty in conceiving just how badly wrong it's possible to get it. Bill, on the other hand, is unfettered by our limitations, and is capable of things we can't conceive of. It's like being such a bad driver that you can make a car turn onto jelly. Most people can't work out how it's done, but for a small, elite band, it's not only possible, but likely.

Couldn't be bothered to edit this? (0)

OakDragon (885217) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741302)

Or is it Slashdot policy to present as received for interviews?

Re:Couldn't be bothered to edit this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741394)

The truth is in between: Slashdot policy is to not be bothered.

They don't edit ANYTHING (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741436)

The janitors who run this site don't edit a thing. Look how many stories have typos, have unintelligible wording, or link to a personal blog that links to another blog that finally links to the real story. How many minutes would that take to fix, 2-3? He'll if you've been around long enough you'll remember one story even had a goatse link because they are too lazy to check anything.

Re:They don't edit ANYTHING (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741792)

>The janitors who run this site don't edit a thing. Look how many stories have typos, [...]

The editors don't write the stories. Slashdot posts summaries of stories on other "sites" on the "internet", so the editors don't have power to edit the stories.

Re:Couldn't be bothered to edit this? (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741458)

Or is it Slashdot policy to present as received for interviews?

I'm not sure (because for the life of me, I can't figure out what you are trying to say), but it's Slashdot policy to have completely grammar-neglected sentences throughout the website.

Re:Couldn't be bothered to edit this? (1)

OakDragon (885217) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741516)

You are right, my sentence construction as atrocious.

"Or is it Slashdot policy to present an interview exactly as they receive it?"

Re:Couldn't be bothered to edit this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741500)

Or is it Slashdot policy to present as received for interviews?

Definitely agree, Shatner did exactly as Timothy suggested "transcended" the traditional /. interview style - what must be transcended to reach a state of pure shit one can only imagine.

Re:Couldn't be bothered to edit this? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741616)

Slashdot's policy is to show ads during the nitpick submission process.

Re:Couldn't be bothered to edit this? (5, Informative)

zaxios (776027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742138)

Here's a properly edited version [slashdot.org] . Only took a few minutes to match question and answer, but that was obviously beyond the abilities of Slashdot's paid editors.

Re:Couldn't be bothered to edit this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37742664)

After reading the edited version, I think Shatner and Slashdot didn't want us to notice that he didn't answer a couple questions.

Love that Shatner still is Shatner (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741384)

Always love to hear him talk, just be himself. So many imaginings of him have been going around for years, yet he's still a pretty cool, regular guy. I hope I can do as well and look back upon a pretty good life when I'm 80.

moD down (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741418)

And comm1nttees [goat.cx]

"Ask Shatner"..... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741428)

I feel like this whole thing was just a huge self promotion for his new upcoming stuff.

Re:"Ask Shatner"..... (2)

The Great Pretender (975978) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741912)

It is and it's not. Shatner now makes money on the image that we have given him, he is not a dumb guy by a long shot. He knows that he's replying to Slashdot and who that audience is, and while he self promotes, he's doing it tongue-in-cheek. He obviously enjoyed the questions and what I read was someone who is having fun replying. The guy has a great sense of humor and is not afraid to wield it in a not-to-subtle way. Just before this guys dies, he's going to utter the phrase "I can't believe that all those people bought that shit." Enjoy the Shatner, I know I do.

Re:"Ask Shatner"..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741938)

I see you don't know anything about William Shatner...

Re:"Ask Shatner"..... (2)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742022)

I feel like this whole thing was just a huge self promotion for his new upcoming stuff.

Wow, what a weird thing for an entertainer to do. I thought he did it because he was bored and was just looking for some human contact, like the rest of Slashdot. You mean this whole "giving interviews" thing has something to do with promotion? That's just weird, man.

Re:"Ask Shatner"..... (2)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742034)

Actors like Shatner will generally do interviews to garner publicity about their upcoming projects, particularly personal ones near and dear to their heart. Its a tradeoff - you have to listen to them talk about their upcoming show and you take what nuggets of interesting information that you can get. It's not like we're paying for it, so...

Re:"Ask Shatner"..... (1)

WillyWanker (1502057) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742090)

Yes, but it's Shatner. Would you expect anything less shameless?

Re:"Ask Shatner"..... (2)

swillden (191260) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742598)

Yes, but it's Shatner. Would you expect anything less shameless?

I think I'd be disappointed in anything less shameless.

Re:"Ask Shatner"..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37742218)

That's what he does.

I saw him at a convention last year. He had an hour to speak to all his fans, who had packed up the largest room in the hotel.

He didn't take any audience questions or talk about anything remotely related to Star Trek. It was all self-promotion - for "#$*( My Dad Says" (which was coming out later that fall) and for some other documentary about the D.C. snipers or something.

I get that maybe he doesn't want to talk about Star Trek all the time, because he's probably bored of it - but then, why go to the convention in the first place? (So he can charge $100 for a signed photo, I guess).

Why not at least talk about genuinely interesting stories or anecdotes (not necessarily related to Trek), rather than one long infomercial? Why not throw the audience a bone and answer at least one or two questions?

Yeah, so his above "response" (self-promotion, peppered with vague, uninteresting, non-responses to some of the questions) didn't surprise me in the least.

Re:"Ask Shatner"..... (1)

KliX (164895) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742312)

He's an actor, that is kind of the entire point.

I like his idea of (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741446)

...a thinking man's action hero, but surely the role of The Doctor is already taken. :)

Seriously, that would be a wonderful blend of traits for Hollywood to experiment with. They've not done anything like that, leaving it mostly to the Brits - and even then the UK has produced exceedingly few such characters overall. I've never really thought much about how such characters would work in the US because there haven't been any, but if Shatner thinks that it would work well for actors and audience alike, then maybe it's time for someone to write a script for it.

Re:I like his idea of (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741536)

Leave Doctor Who alone. Why does the US film industry and tv industry feel the need to remake good foreign stuff? Just put the original on the air and shove off.

Re:I like his idea of (2)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741682)

The Brits have leagues of such thinking action heroes, but that's because they really like detective shows so much more. There used to be similar shows in the US like Hawaii Five-O and Kojak, but now it's all about "teams" like Law & Order and CSI, where there really isn't one badass hero detective that figures everything out and then personally breaks down doors.

Re:I like his idea of (1)

howlinmonkey (548055) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742606)

Dr. Cal Lightman in Lie to Me. He works with a crew, but he is a badass hero.

Hugh Laurie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37742186)

If I could cast anyone to be The Doctor it would be Hugh Laurie. And he can do a convincing British accent. (that's a joke, btw)

Re:I like his idea of (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37742330)

There have been a few thinking man's action heros throughout the years, even in Hollywood. Indiana Jones immediately springs to mind.

The expensive wardrobe (1)

flaming error (1041742) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741456)

It is possible to be beautifully dressed and to be your character especially if you get to keep the expensive wardrobe

Coincidentally, strutting around in Star Trek uniforms is Shatner's preferred disguise for a night on the town in Vegas.

Re:The expensive wardrobe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37741522)

Whose preferred disguise isn't that?

Re:The expensive wardrobe (3, Funny)

flaming error (1041742) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741648)

Good point. Last year outside Bellagio I saw Elvis dressed as Capt. Janeway.

Re:The expensive wardrobe (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741928)

Your ideas intrigue me and I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Coming to Edmonton (1)

decipher_saint (72686) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741696)

Shatner will be in Edmonton on October 23rd at the Shaw Conference Centre.

I know I'll be there

WTF (0)

zoomshorts (137587) | more than 3 years ago | (#37741838)

What the fuck is this diatribe? It looks like drivel! OF the first magnitude!

Edited version - much easier to read imho (4, Informative)

zaxios (776027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742030)

How has technology changed acting for you?
by wired_parrot

TV and movie productions have become more technically elaborate over the years, evolving from what were essentially filmed theatrical productions, to elaborate and technically demanding productions that require a large industry of people to support it. In your view, how has technology changed the role and experience of acting since you started?

Do you think young actors today have it easier?
by elrous0

In your early days, there were only a few major television networks, and it was much more difficult to move back and forth between television and movies. Today, with so many cable shows, the internet, and with actors moving much more freely between movies and television, do you think young actors have it easier? Or do you think that the proliferation of reality television and the "noise" of so many channels/series has actually made things harder for scripted actors?

Answer to both: Performing a role is always the same. You take a deep breath, you speak words, you hit marks, and you listen to what other people say. What has changed is the amount of light that is necessary to get your image on film - which by now is candlelight. So that it's not any harder and certainly not any easier to be an actor. Yes, there is more need for content, but so much of that content doesn't require experience, talent, the ability to speak English or in fact, the ability to stand upright (e.g. The Jersey Shore).

The cerebral characters you've played vs. pure action heroes?
by jd

Are there times you wish you'd had a quieter, more sedate career like, say, Roger Moore or Bruce Lee, or is there a part of you that craves the geekier, more cerebral hero roles you've played?

Answer: There is a great deal of fun in doing stunts. It makes for a lot of physical activity. You have to remember to do your pushups but sitting in a chair and talking about how you feel is also entertainment, at least for the actor. Now if you have a thinking man's action hero, that would be ideal.

Uniforms
by milbournosphere

Mr. Shatner: I recently watched my way through The Original Series and you were constantly pulling your uniform shirt down. I've also heard that the red uniforms from the movies were quite cumbersome to design and wear. Which was more uncomfortable to you, the uniforms from the original television episodes or the red command uniforms from the movies?

Answer: Wardrobe is certainly a consideration in many instances. It is possible to be beautifully dressed and to be your character especially if you get to keep the expensive wardrobe. The Star Trek wardrobes were made of stretch material so if your lunch was more than bread and water, you had to keep pulling those shirts down because they tended to ride up.

Favorite non-Star Trek roles?
by loftwyr

Outside of the Star Trek series, you've had a large number of regular, one-off and recurring roles. What would be your favorite role prior to the beginnings of Star Trek and after the original ST series run? If different, what was your favourite one-off?

Answer: I don't think of favorite roles like 'This was my favorite thing to do, and that isn't.' I just wish they hadn't cancelled Shit My Dad Says because I could bicycle to work.

Boston Legal
by gurps_npc

You seemed to have a great relationship with Mr. Spader - was that all fantastic acting, or did you become friends - as in you still see/speak with him even after the show ended?

Answer: It's best to be friendly with the people you are working with and that goes for everything including acting. If you dislike a person and you have to say 'I love you,' it certainly makes things difficult. I have remained friends with most of the people I have worked with through the years.

Right now I am working on my new album, Seeking Major Tom, my new book, Shatner Rules, a new DVD of the documentary The Captains, and I want all you people in Canada to come to my one man show that starts on October 19th in Vancouver and goes through to Montreal a couple of weeks later, in between, visiting all the major cities.

Do you still practice archery?
by WillAdams

(Back in 1995 or so you were still noted as an archer and had been for quite a while.)

If so, how often, using what equipment? Still using a compound or have you gone back to using a recurve or longbow? If you do still shoot, do you travel w/ your archery gear? Any issues in doing so? Or amusing anecdotes?


Answer: I am involved in many sports. I think of myself as an athlete. But instead of archery these days I am competing on horseback and I am having just as much fun.

Tek and a vision of the future
by The Bastard

Mr. Shatner, it's been 22 years since TekWar was first published; seventeen since the television series gave us a "common" visualization of Tek itself. Since those two milestones, I've found it intriguing how our technological advancement seems to be aiming towards the development of Tek. And not just advancement with computers and the Internet, but within the neuroscience and brain-computer interface fields also. It is within the realm of possibility that Tek--or similar digital drug--will exist within a couple of decades.

Could you talk about how the concept of Tek came about? Was it just a "crazy idea" that hit you while riding one of your horses, or did you sit down by yourself or others to develop a vision of the future and build a story around that? Also, looking around at people addicted to using smartphones everywhere, what are your thoughts regarding a form of Tek coming into existence in the next decade or two?


Answer: When I wrote Tek Wars, there was a strike that prevented us from working on a movie so I built a detective story of the future. I love to watch TV and it seemed to me that was the drug of the future and low and behold, you can't tell the color of peoples' eyes anymore because they are looking down fixated on their texting.

The Captains
by doramjan

Do you have any insights from your interviews with the other Captions from the documentary The Captains that didn't make the cut? Please share, if so. I found that documentary fascinating and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Answer: I enjoyed making The Captains tremendously. The insights garnered from the various actors and my own epiphany I thought made an interesting film. It can seen October 20th on Movie Central in Canada at 9pm MT/8PT and the DVD can be purchased on the United States only right now (as of October 18th).

Henry Rollins
by mrmud

Henry Rollins tells a great and funny story about working with you on a musical project. What is your perspective on the story?

Answer: I have a new album out called Seeking Major Tom and to my great disappointment, Henry Rollins is not on it, otherwise [would] have had another funny story to tell about working with me.

Commodore VIC-20
by GIL_Dude

When I was a kid, your commercial for the Commodore VIC-20 convinced me that I had to have one (because Captain Kirk was advertising it!). I used it to learn some programming (both BASIC and assembler) and it was the early foundation for what I do today. The question: Did you actually use one of them day to day or was it just something they hired you to advertise and they gave you one and it sat in the corner?

Answer: I used to try to assemble computers way back when and they came out looking like a skateboard. I soon gave it up.

Canadian politics?
by kabrakan

You've jested about this in the past, but do you have any thoughts on running for a political seat in the Canadian government? We'd love to have you (but hey, anyone can do better than the current guy in the top seat).

Answer: There's a large group of people who want me to be the Governor General but other than throwing a party for the king and queen, I don't know what else he does.

Inspiring the next generation?
by techmuse

Growing up, Star Trek was one of the things that got me interested in engineering and the sciences. It made me want to see the future, or create it myself. What do you think should be done to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers?

Answer: Star Trek helped inspire a whole generation of scientists and engineers with the magic of today's electronics I would think people of all kinds would try to find ways of working with around about computers and I also think that with the NASA program put on hold, it is a shame that we can't inspire the younger generation that way.

The growing "anti-smart" person culture
by PotatoHead

There is a growing "anti-smart" person culture out there now. When you were playing Kirk, kids could get a real chemistry set, for example. Now it's a lot different, and that desire to "boldly go where no man has gone before" seems blunted, constrained and discouraged. Much better to play in the sand box with the other kids.

When you were playing Kirk, I was a free range kid doing all manner of things, and yes that includes blowing stuff up. Now free range kids are increasingly rare as we consider that bad parenting, or they are "at risk," or some other fear based thing. Have you noticed these changes? What do you think about them?


Answer: [None.]

Mortality?
by optimism

Mr. Shatner: Recently I saw you in the Raymond Kurzweil documentary Transcendant Man, where you emphatically said that you do not want to die. This year, you have exceeded the average life expectancy of a male for ANY country in the world. Iceland is highest at 80.2 years; you are now 80.5 years.

So my question(s): Are you still fighting the battle for physical/mental immortality? If so, how? If not, can you describe the process you have gone through to accept your mortality and ultimately death?


Answer: Death is increasingly fascinating to me the closer I get to it and if I could reach Kurzweil's Singularity, I would don the Iron Man's suit although come to think of it, how do you sleep? Do you sleep on your back? But since that is not possible, I live in a balancing act of terror and acceptance every day.

Cxu vi ankoraux estas Esperantisto?
by Yekrats

Bill, you're well known in the Esperanto world as the star of the pre-Star Trek thriller Incubus, written and performed in Esperanto.
Cxu vi ankoraux regas vian Esperanto-kapablon de tiu filmo? (Have you still retained your Esperanto ability from that movie?)

Cxu vi uzis gxin iel ajn poste? (Have you used it an any way afterwards?)

Answer: If anyone asks you to star in a movie shot entirely in Esperanto, say 'Kiam Kaj Kiel Multa?'

Shuttle Enterprise
by wideBlueSkies

Mr Shatner, can you share what your thoughts were when you found out that NASA decided to name the 1st shuttle as The Enterprise? Can you offer any insights into the general thoughts of the rest of the cast or Gene himself? How was it for you, knowing that part of the show had such an influence on that segment of the world, meaning the fans and the space community, that they actually honored the show by naming a real spacecraft after it?

Also, how the hell did you get mixed up with the Charlie Sheen roast? You're the last guy I expected to see... but your "who's the warlock now? Bitch" was indeed the highlight of the night.


Answer: In the documentary The Captains, I meet all the actors and share heartfelt thoughts about what it took to do the series. How proud we all are of being in the show and Star Trek's place in our culture. By the way, did I mention how you can get a DVD of The Captains? Amazon.com.

I had the best time at the Charlie Sheen Roast which I incorporate into my one man show which opens October 19th. Did I mention that earlier?

Will you ever tour?
by buanzo

Mr Shatner, It's an honor to at least have the chance of asking you something. Thank you for your time. And for everything. Have you considered touring, as a stand-up comedian or whatever, specially outside U.S. and Canada? You know, you have a gigantic fanbase in, ehem, Argentina.

Answer: [None.]

Re:Edited version - much easier to read imho (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37742438)

Thank you. Why couldn't the slashdot editors have done this?

The Governor General UpperCut (1)

hebertrich (472331) | more than 3 years ago | (#37742122)

"There's a large group of people who want me to be the Governor General but other than throwing a party for the king and queen, I don't know what else he does" W.S.

Dear William
For once someone told as it is the exact sentiment we all have towards the position of Governor General in Canada.
We appreciate your direct , frank and honest approach. But yes we would like to see you as GG As a symbol , it would have been great.
But .what do they do ? We need Shatner be Shatner and not some puppet If everyone spoke their minds like you did , the world would know a wave of change sweeping the past behind and entering into a new phase of advancement for the whole of the human race.
Change the world by speaking frankly and openly in order to make on earth the distant fantastic civilisation we all came to dream about through the lens of what was being done on Star Trek.

As for the Governor General .. i don't know why we should keep the Queen's representative or any other artefact of that era.
We have severed our links to monarchy.Time for the Office of General Governor to close down . I would have loved to hear what you think of the Canadian Senate That would certainly have been hilarious :) It was a great uppercut and congratulation for the KO :)

Looking forward to your visit.
FTB

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