×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

The 2014 Hugo Awards

Soulskill posted about 3 months ago | from the congratulations-to-all dept.

Sci-Fi 180

Dave Knott writes: WorldCon 2014 wrapped up in London this last weekend and this year's Hugo Award winners were announced. Notable award winners include:

Best Novel: Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie
Best Novelette: "The Lady Astronaut of Mars" by Mary Robinette Kowal
Best Novella: "Equoid" by Charles Stross
Best Short Story: "The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere" by John Chu
Best Graphic Story: "Time" by Randall Munroe
Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form): Gravity written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, directed by Alfonso Cuarón
Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form): Game of Thrones: "The Rains of Castamere" written by David Benioff & D.B. Weiss, directed by David Nutter

The results of this year's awards were awaited with some some trepidation in the SF community, due to well-documented attempts by some controversial authors to game the voting system. These tactics appear to have been largely unsuccessful, as this is the fourth major award for the Leckie novel, which had already won the 2013 BSFA, 2013 Nebula and 2014 Clarke awards.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Informative winners list (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720179)

Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form): Gravity written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, directed by Alfonso Cuarón

And that's where I knew to disregard the rest of the winners list as well. Thanks for the warning on rubbish to ignore.

Re:Informative winners list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720265)

Aw, poor Frozen fangirl, did your widdle cartoon not win?

Re:Informative winners list (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 3 months ago | (#47720287)

What should have won?

Re:Informative winners list (2, Interesting)

marsu_k (701360) | about 3 months ago | (#47720361)

If the award is to be given to an actual science fiction movie? Europa Report [imdb.com] .

Re:Informative winners list (2)

Kelbear (870538) | about 3 months ago | (#47721743)

I really liked Europa Report and I recommend it to sci-fi fans. But the criticisms against that movie were well placed, and Best Dramatic Presentation? If anything, the movie was intentionally downplaying the inherent drama of their predicament in order to keep the movie grounded in a more documentary format. Sci-fi fans should definitely check out Europa Report, but I don't think it would have won here.

Re:Informative winners list (2, Interesting)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 3 months ago | (#47720321)

If there's one thing I've learned reading all kinds of award-winning books, is that more often than not, the award is a big warning that the book is shit, or pompous, or written specifically to woo often sophisticated, pedantic jury members into giving the award.

In short, I usually go for stuff that hasn't been awarded certain kinds of awards. The Hugo certainly seems overrated these days, and has been for many years.

Re:Informative winners list (3, Insightful)

Tx (96709) | about 3 months ago | (#47720697)

I agree about the winners in recent years, although I usually peruse the best novel nominees, quite a few of my favourite books have been "losing" Hugo or Nebula nominees.

Re:Informative winners list (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about 3 months ago | (#47720975)

The Hugo awards come from the audience. The audience is a bunch of drooling retards. Also, I'm surprised XKCD got the graphic story thing.

Seriously, Game of Thrones and The Hunger Games are largely a joke. And they're bringing out Dragon Tattoo movies. You won't see Gateway or The Gap Cycle as a dramatic long-form series (it's too fucking massive to run as a set of movies); I would love to produce The Gap Cycle as a scifi-drama-epic narrative in an opera-style, as the prose won't translate to modern theatrical style. ("He looked over at the alarming medistat screen. It said he was awake. No shit. It also said...")

You really want the Nebula awards.

Re:Informative winners list (2)

hawkinspeter (831501) | about 3 months ago | (#47721169)

I'm sure you're right, but I did enjoy Equoid by Charles Stross. Then again, I'm a fan of the Laundry series, so I'm not going to be that critical of his writing.

Re:Informative winners list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721319)

This. Charlie stross isn't a fan of purple prose (he actually makes fun of it in Equoid)

Re:Informative winners list (3, Informative)

jratcliffe (208809) | about 3 months ago | (#47721243)

"the book is shit, or pompous, or written specifically to woo often sophisticated, pedantic jury members into giving the award."

Over 3,500 people voted on the Hugos this year, not exactly a tiny jury.

Re:Informative winners list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721289)

Most people are idiots.

Re:Informative winners list (1)

tippe (1136385) | about 3 months ago | (#47721695)

Most people are idiots.

You forgot to add "present company excluded"..., right?

Anyway, reminds me of a George Carlin quote that I saw in somebody's sig once:

“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” -- George Carlin

Re:Informative winners list (0)

marsu_k (701360) | about 3 months ago | (#47720333)

I have to agree, I really don't understand why Gravity is held in such high regard. Yes, visually it was very good. I also liked the audio design (apart from the fact that there's too much of Sandra Bullock breathing heavily). But as a movie I found it rather boring.

Re:Informative winners list (4, Insightful)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 3 months ago | (#47720641)

Maybe it's because opinion is subjective.

Re:Informative winners list (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 3 months ago | (#47720663)

I found it extraordinarily tense. walking out of the theater I realized I had been holding my breath for the entire movie.

Re:Informative winners list (2, Insightful)

marsu_k (701360) | about 3 months ago | (#47720747)

But I found much of the tension to be very artificial. For example (spoilers ahoy!), when Bullock and Clooney reach ISS, both being tethered with a rope. And are no longer moving. Yet, Bullock is forced to cut the rope, because of... what, exactly? (yes, their characters had names, no longer remember them)

Re:Informative winners list (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 3 months ago | (#47720823)

I think it was intended to be an emotional movie, not an analytical movie. Try to enjoy it on the director's terms not on your terms.

Re:Informative winners list (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 months ago | (#47720989)

The director set terms: The terms are near-future, realistic setting. Then those terms were violated. From there comes the problem.

Re:Informative winners list (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 3 months ago | (#47720999)

Those two goals are in no way incompatible. There's no need to employ sloppy writing to generate emotion unless your goal is a high score on What's Wrong With.

Re:Informative winners list (1)

mythosaz (572040) | about 3 months ago | (#47721411)

The movie where they drift off into space, never encounter another object, and slowly die wasn't as interesting...

Re:Informative winners list (2)

91degrees (207121) | about 3 months ago | (#47721465)

The problem here for a lot of people is it breaks them out of their suspension of disbelief. We've established this as a representation of a fairly realistic world when something we know wouldn't happen happens.

If we established earlier that this was a world with its own physics then we'd accept it.

Re:Informative winners list (1)

torkus (1133985) | about 3 months ago | (#47720905)

If both those claims are equally accurate...it about jives with my experience as well

Re:Informative winners list (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about 3 months ago | (#47720939)

...and you could still walk and be alive after holding your breath for so many minutes?
PROOF THAT ALIENS ARE AMONG US!

Re:Informative winners list (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 3 months ago | (#47721387)

No,that would be Twitter.

Re:Informative winners list (4, Interesting)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 months ago | (#47720979)

It's soft sci-fi pretending to be hard sci-fi.

It's perfectly fine to have non-realistic physics in science fiction. It just needs some justification or explanation. Future super-tech that hasn't been invented, or a revolution in our understanding of the universe. This is a good thing: It lets you introduce a 'magic box' like a perfect lie detector or an artificial intelligence and then examine the impact it would have. Or it can just serve as the backdrop to a more conventional story, like a space opera - just throw in some vague mumbling about the hyperdrive, it doesn't matter how the thing is supposed to work so long as it gets the characters where they need to go.

But Gravity doesn't have that excuse. It's supposed to be realistic. It's supposed to be near-future. That sets certain constraints. For a layperson it might be acceptable for an astronaut to jump out the ISS and achieve an orbital intersection and velocity match by eye with a distant station - but for anyone who knows the slightest thing about space travel, or has played Kerbal Space Program, this as as glaring a violation of the established rules of the setting as if she'd cobbled together a teleporter from the wreckage.

Re:Informative winners list (2)

Timothy Hartman (2905293) | about 3 months ago | (#47720423)

Considering it was one spot from the bottom of the list you only disregarded Game of Thrones.

Re:Informative winners list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720767)

well I just tried reading "The Lady Astronaut..." and fell asleep....

oh dear oh dear - ugh

Informative winners list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721731)

That was my first thought too. 75 minutes of Sandra Bullock talking to herself and utterly failing as an actress now wins a hugo? Not to mention, don't most sci-fi fans actually like a little bit of technical plausibility in their stories?

Asimov's Science Fiction (1)

sinij (911942) | about 3 months ago | (#47720219)

I am disappointed that Asimov's didn't even run this year's short story winner. I feel like Sheila was out of it for the past couple issues.

Re:Asimov's Science Fiction (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 3 months ago | (#47720685)

I met a guy who gave me a lyft ride that had submitted a story to anthology. it was about a futuristic spider queen or something like that? I forget his name.

first post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720227)

first post

Doctor Who (1)

AlecDalek (3781731) | about 3 months ago | (#47720259)

Can believe they snubbed Doctor Who this year. There were at least 4 Doctor who stories in the running.

Re:Doctor Who (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720331)

I'd think a Dalek would be most pleased to see the Doctor not get a prize.

4th Doctor is BEST Doctor. Scientific fact. (1)

Thud457 (234763) | about 3 months ago | (#47720363)

That Doctor Who reboot isn't scientific fiction. It's pure fantasy and Americanized Michael Bay actionexplosions(tm) . That "Doctor" deals with every problem by waving his magic wand like Harry Potter and yelling "RUN!".

Re: 4th Doctor is BEST Doctor. Scientific fact. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720701)

Funny, because one of the episodes nominated is about a time when the Doctor doesn't run but spends about 1000 years defending a small town from invaders and fixing toys.

Re:4th Doctor is BEST Doctor. Scientific fact. (1)

symes (835608) | about 3 months ago | (#47720711)

Game of Thrones is science fiction?

Re:4th Doctor is BEST Doctor. Scientific fact. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720893)

If youve ever watched the intro you would notice that the map matches nowhere on this earth....

Re:4th Doctor is BEST Doctor. Scientific fact. (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 3 months ago | (#47721037)

How in holy hell does that make it science fiction? You just buried the bar for the lowest definition under the earth rendering The Wonderful Wizard of Oz into science fiction.

Re:4th Doctor is BEST Doctor. Scientific fact. (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 3 months ago | (#47721409)

Well, given the era in which it was produced, the Tin Man sure looks like a robot. That should count.

Re:4th Doctor is BEST Doctor. Scientific fact. (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 3 months ago | (#47721691)

Well, given the era in which it was produced, the Tin Man sure looks like a robot. That should count.

Actually, he does qualify as a cyborg or something like that.

He was built by a sort of reverse-Cyberman upgrade process. Limb by limb.

Re:4th Doctor is BEST Doctor. Scientific fact. (1)

jratcliffe (208809) | about 3 months ago | (#47721193)

Agreed on the reboot, but your claim about best Doctor is off by 25% - it's clearly the 5th Doctor.

Re:Doctor Who (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 3 months ago | (#47720695)

yeah but they gave an award to the red wedding and you have to admit that was pretty badass.

foist pswot? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720273)

obxkcd link [xkcd.com] (obnoxious XKCD link)

"Time" won Best Graphic Story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720309)

Um, what?

http://xkcd.com/1190/

It's a nice one panel comic but...huh? How did this win anything?

Re: "Time" won Best Graphic Story? (4, Informative)

TheGavster (774657) | about 3 months ago | (#47720421)

It's actually several thousand frames that play out a sequence of events. It was notable both because of the unique presentation (most frames, particularly the early ones, change only subtly) and because of the details that go into establishing the otherwise unexplained setting.

Re:"Time" won Best Graphic Story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720437)

Click on that one panel....
It's a link to the whole story.

Re:"Time" won Best Graphic Story? (2)

Millennium (2451) | about 3 months ago | (#47720445)

What you see at that link is only the last panel. The story was revealed frame-by-frame over a much longer period of time.

I do think it would be nice if xkcd made the whole thing available, but others have managed. The Wikipedia link above can point you at some of them.

Re:"Time" won Best Graphic Story? (3, Informative)

Atzanteol (99067) | about 3 months ago | (#47721749)

Click the panel itself. Brings you here:

http://geekwagon.net/projects/... [geekwagon.net]

Obligatory XKCD (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720329)

http://geekwagon.net/projects/xkcd1190/

Tactics unsuccessful? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720367)

Maybe not. Maybe they're a front, and the real shenanigans are in fact hugely successful.

Re:Tactics unsuccessful? (1)

Nimey (114278) | about 3 months ago | (#47720757)

You're moving the goalposts and positing a conspiracy theory.

Time (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720375)

This is undoubtedly the first hugo award for a graphic story featuring stick figures.

Novel (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720417)

Ancillary Justice has its merits but read like an first novelist's smart attempt at crossing Alistair Reynolds with Iain M. Banks. Indeed, all three can/could do with good editors to tidy the worst longeurs. There's a little too much fashion sometimes; I rate Phillip Mann's The Disestablishment of Paradise as the strongest sf novel I've read in the past year, stylistically, structurally, thematically and in its characterisation and humour; it betters the Leckie IMO but only made one of the shortlists.

[/. Member, AC due to travel]

Re:Novel (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 3 months ago | (#47721455)

Ancillary Justice has its merits but read like an first novelist's smart attempt at crossing Alistair Reynolds with Iain M. Banks. Indeed, all three can/could do with good editors to tidy the worst longeurs. There's a little too much fashion sometimes; I rate Phillip Mann's The Disestablishment of Paradise as the strongest sf novel I've read in the past year, stylistically, structurally, thematically and in its characterisation and humour; it betters the Leckie IMO but only made one of the shortlists.

[/. Member, AC due to travel]

Interesting, but as an annoying sidelight that is altogether too common:

HOWEVER!! The Kindle version which I received was full of typos, missing letters and missing words. There were enough mistakes that it passed through annoying and actually affected my ability to follow the story. To their credit the publisher contacted me directly to apologise and asked for examples of mistakes. I've provided some examples but have not heard back, nor do I know how to verify that current versions of the Kindle book have been fixed.

I hate that. How hard is it to copy something into a machine readable format that started out in machine readable format. What do they do, running through Slashdot's filters?

Re:Novel (1)

nogginthenog (582552) | about 3 months ago | (#47721609)

HOWEVER!! The Kindle version which I received was full of typos, missing letters and missing words. There were enough mistakes that it passed through annoying and actually affected my ability to follow the story. To their credit the publisher contacted me directly to apologise and asked for examples of mistakes. I've provided some examples but have not heard back, nor do I know how to verify that current versions of the Kindle book have been fixed.

I don't recall any formatting issues in the version I read.
In the past I bought a (self published, I think) Kindle book that was poorly formatted and Amazon refunded it immediately.

Re:Novel (1)

nogginthenog (582552) | about 3 months ago | (#47721557)

I enjoyed Ancillary Justice and am glad Ann Leckie won, but you could tell it's a first novel. Her next novel is out in the next couple of months and will be worth a look at.

It's not an attempt to "game the system"... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720471)

...it's an attempt to protest the forces of political correctness (represented by Wiscon's radical feminist faction) who are attempting to get people fired [fantasticalandrewfox.com] for not toeing the line.

Re:It's not an attempt to "game the system"... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720551)

That, and the fact that SFWA has been hijacked by amateurs purging actual, accomplished writers for perceived thought-crime.

Re:It's not an attempt to "game the system"... (0)

Nimey (114278) | about 3 months ago | (#47720705)

tl;dr: conservatives are victims because the fans don't want to read their output.

Re:It's not an attempt to "game the system"... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721071)

Conservatives (and libertarians, and the "wrong" type of liberal) are victims of the New York-based publishing industry's obsession with adherence to certain ideologies. The fact that such authors impacted by the "Gatekeepers of New York" often find more success by electronic publishing (and/or publishing with a small press elsewhere, or with Baen Books), while much of the traditional publishing industry continues to decline and treat all but their best-selling authors increasingly poorly (decreased advances, Hollywood accounting), suggests that the major publishers simply aren't publishing what people want to read.

Re:It's not an attempt to "game the system"... (1)

Nimey (114278) | about 3 months ago | (#47721095)

You're giving me a conspiracy theory with a fuckton of assumptions and unsupported allegations.

Re:It's not an attempt to "game the system"... (1)

almitydave (2452422) | about 3 months ago | (#47721685)

You're giving me a conspiracy theory with a fuckton of assumptions and unsupported allegations.

That's redundant. Like Mel said [imdb.com] , if you can prove it, it wouldn't be a good conspiracy now, would it?

So, what controversy? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720495)

The link to the controversy is next to useless. I visited at least 6 of the downstream links and none of them gave a summary for people who haven't been following this story. Who has done what and why is it bad?

Re:So, what controversy? (2)

91degrees (207121) | about 3 months ago | (#47720527)

Theodore Beale (who uses the en name Vox Day) has generally been making enemies by being racist, sexist and generally unpleasant. He does seem to have at least some fans though.

He allegedly encouraged his fans to buy a memebership solely to get his short story on the ballot.

Probably wouldn't have blown up quite so much but Beale seems to have been winding up the sci-fi writers association for some time.

Re:So, what controversy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720777)

And a lot of people calling Vox Day racist and sexist have never read a word he wrote. He seems like an unpleasant person, but that is hardly a disqualification. MY issue is the witch-hunt for anyone even implying that maybe Vox Day isn't the worst person in the world. I don't really give a crap about Vox Day but a lot of fine people are being targeted for offering defenses for Vox Day.

Re:So, what controversy? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721515)

>If Americans can find the courage to consciously reject the myth of the melting pot and expel the Mexicans from the American Southwest, the Arabs from Detroit and the Somalis from Minneapolis, they can reclaim their traditional white Anglo-Saxon Protestant culture.

or maybe

>EuropeÃ(TM)s demise is all but assured, thanks to them, as womenÃ(TM)s individual choices taken in the collective have stricken European society and brought on successive waves of feminist-friendly Islamic immigration by reducing EuropeÃ(TM)s birth rates far below replacement levels

or

>The women of America would do well to consider whether their much-cherished gains of the right to vote, work, murder and freely fornicate are worth destroying marriage, children, civilized Western society and little girls

Yeah, I don't think it takes a lot of digging to find out he is a racist, sexist scumbag.

Re:So, what controversy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721301)

Racist? Sexist? I need to read this Theodore Beale; he has the right enemies.

Game of Thrones = Sci-FI? (0)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about 3 months ago | (#47720501)

I like GOT as much as the next nerdish type dude, but how is it sci-fi?

Re:Game of Thrones = Sci-FI? (4, Informative)

jlockard (140979) | about 3 months ago | (#47720605)

From the Hugos' webiste:

"Science Fiction? Fantasy? Horror?

While the World Science Fiction Society sponsors the Hugos, they are not limited to sf. Works of fantasy or horror are eligible if the members of the Worldcon think they are eligible."

Re:Game of Thrones = Sci-FI? (2)

91degrees (207121) | about 3 months ago | (#47720633)

So is historical fiction if the theme seems sci-fi enough; Apollo 13 had a nomination.

Re:Game of Thrones = Sci-FI? (1)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about 3 months ago | (#47720933)

Ah Gotcha, had always assumed the Hugo award was relegated to just sci-fi. Thanks for setting me straight with a minimum of snark :)

Re:Game of Thrones = Sci-FI? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720611)

It isn't.

The Hugo Awards, to give them their full title, are awards for excellence in the field of science fiction and fantasy. Hugo Faq [thehugoawards.org]

Re:Game of Thrones = Sci-FI? (1)

MRe_nl (306212) | about 3 months ago | (#47720653)

[Spoiler Alert] In book six Adam Reiths' spaceship is shot down by "dragons" and it turns out the books are but a prelude to Jack Vance's "Planet of Adventure"

Re:Game of Thrones = Sci-FI? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721161)

Oh man, this would be AWESOME.

Ancillary Justice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720529)

Ancillary Justice was a good read, it had an interesting story and I much prefer it over Redshirts (previous year's best novel winner).
I don't know how Redshirts got to the very top though, when (also) Scalzi's "Old Man's War" books didn't, and were much better imho.

Of the Hugo Award winners however I consider that the absolute best in the past 20 years was Vernor Vinge's "A Deepness in the Sky" (2000) - really solid SF that one..

Re: Ancillary Justice (2)

stoolpigeon (454276) | about 3 months ago | (#47720805)

I am a big Scalzi fan and have loved every bit of his fiction that I have read - except for Redshirts. So I don't get it either, but a lot of people love it. A TV show will come of it and that escapes me as well. Apparently we are just not in touch with something a lot of other people see in it.

Re: Ancillary Justice (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 3 months ago | (#47721479)

A TV show about Redshirts? Didn't we just finish the Star Trek reboots?

Re: Ancillary Justice (1)

Shatrat (855151) | about 3 months ago | (#47721643)

We will never finish the star trek reboots. 1000 years from now they will still be making them and people will be believe that Captain Kirk was a real historical figure.

Gravity isn't SF (1)

zap1992 (2795907) | about 3 months ago | (#47720547)

Gravity isn't science fiction. We actually do send people into space, and that kind of disaster could sort of happen. There's no speculative science, predictions of the future, or fantasy elements to it. And that's really cool--what seems so much like SF is actually a real-life job that some people do everyday.

Re:Gravity isn't SF (2)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 3 months ago | (#47720865)

it was fictional. it was about science. what more do you want? I would say Apollo 13 and the right stuff aren't science fiction, but most every other movie involving space is science fiction.

Re:Gravity isn't SF (1)

zap1992 (2795907) | about 3 months ago | (#47721217)

It really doesn't involve any more science than any other movie, and I would hardly consider simply using science to be the defining characteristic of SF. SF uses science, or pretends to, in fantastic ways that are not currently possible in order to tell a story--usually one about the ramifications of fictional science or technology. Sending astronauts into low Earth orbit is not only possible, it's routinely done.

Rigged (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720573)

Why did teh Star Warz win anything?!?!?!

Sad Puppy Slate (2, Interesting)

Daetrin (576516) | about 3 months ago | (#47720673)

"Largely unsuccessful" is a bit of an understatement. Those who follow such things have been rejoicing that the "Sad Puppy Slate" ended up last in all the author categories, and that the novella by Vox Day, the guy with very... questionable political and personal views, actually ended up below "No Award". I think it's interesting that despite the outcries and rage and threats about "No Awarding" the entire slate, the only nominee to actually meet such a fate was the one that almost everyone agreed was literarily a piece of garbage.

One does have to wonder how the "Sad Puppy Slate" would have done if it hadn't weighed itself down with a nominee that was simultaneously so objectionable and so poorly written.

http://whatever.scalzi.com/201... [scalzi.com]
http://whatever.scalzi.com/201... [scalzi.com]

Re:Sad Puppy Slate (1)

halivar (535827) | about 3 months ago | (#47720827)

So the Hugo awards are a popularity contest.

Re:Sad Puppy Slate (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 3 months ago | (#47720879)

Have been for some time. Very few awards aren't.

Re:Sad Puppy Slate (5, Insightful)

Daetrin (576516) | about 3 months ago | (#47720935)

Yes, they are. Anyone who thinks otherwise hasn't been paying attention. The Nebula awards are a popularity contest as judged by people in the industry (authors and possibly editors and publishers as well, i forget the specifics,) while the Hugo awards are a popularity contest as judged by the public.

In theory in both contests the popularity is supposed to be based on the quality of the work. That rule is probably more closely observed for the Nebulas than the Hugos, but in both cases it is impossible to eliminate all personal biases.

I voted in the Hugos and personally found the Vox Day work to be junk, while the other works from the "Sad Puppy Slate" were decent, though not anything i would have considered worth nominating myself. Obviously i agree with the results, but obviously i am also biased like every other human being.

So yes, the Hugos are a popularity contest, as are the Nebulas, the Oscars, the Grammys, and every other reward for artistic achievement that you can think of.

Re:Sad Puppy Slate (1)

pavon (30274) | about 3 months ago | (#47721047)

Thanks for posting a link that actually mostly explains the issue. Much more helpful than the summary that posted a link to a huge list of links, and of the ones I clicked, half weren't applicable to the issue, and the other half were just opinion pieces that assumed you were already familiar with the controversy. Horrible editing.

well-documented attempts to expose nomination bias (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720693)

Some of what was going on was designed to expose the EXISTING issues with Hugo nominations and voting. There have been strong indications of idealogical bias in the 'acceptable' nominations for quite a while. As a result of the efforts made the last two years, some of the reasons for that bias, and some of its proponents, have 'outed' themselves. The absolutely vile hatred spewed out by the 'powers that be', basically the 'establishment' that has been running the nominations and awards for years was breathtaking; the near total (but happily NOT total) lack of any effort to actually debate the issue was, sadly, expected. If you the author, or your story, did not adhere to or support the dogma of the establishment, why then you were a horrible author, a rape apologist, a fascist, or worse.

Ad hominem attacks. Slanders against the authors in question. It was all pretty interesting. Unfortunately, much like the constant exposure of corruption and pandering in politics in the nation, it will likely be forgotten unless some few brave folks stand up again next year.

Re:well-documented attempts to expose nomination b (1)

Nimey (114278) | about 3 months ago | (#47720919)

tl;dr: conservative SF authors are victims because people like other authors' works better.

Re:well-documented attempts to expose nomination b (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721117)

No, just an indicator that there are more liberal SF fans going to WorldCons. I personally know a large number of conservative and libertarian who think the Hugo process is "rigged" and hence don't want to spend the money to participate. There are *some* problems with the process, but not that many. So, liberal fans happy with the results will continue to buy WorldCon memberships even if just to vote, and conservative and libertarian fans will continue to stay away because they're unhappy, further reinforcing the mindset of most involved in the process.

Re:well-documented attempts to expose nomination b (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721561)

I won't give a dime to vote since the system is run by those who possess views I find odious. The difference between me and them is I vote with my wallet and they piss and moan and libel those that disagree with them.

Sci-Fi trend at my local library (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 3 months ago | (#47720709)

This is an aside to TFS, and more of a rant.

At my local library they have folded the Sci-Fi section in with the general fiction books. Which means I can no longer browse just Sci-Fi books. I am not sure why they did it, but what irks me a bit is that the Mystery section still remain separate.

Re:Sci-Fi trend at my local library (3, Funny)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 3 months ago | (#47720963)

"At my local library they have folded the Sci-Fi section in with the general fiction books. Which means I can no longer browse just Sci-Fi books. I am not sure why they did it, but what irks me a bit is that the Mystery section still remain separate."

That sounds mysterious. You should investigate.

Re:Sci-Fi trend at my local library (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 3 months ago | (#47721661)

"At my local library they have folded the Sci-Fi section in with the general fiction books. Which means I can no longer browse just Sci-Fi books. I am not sure why they did it, but what irks me a bit is that the Mystery section still remain separate."

That sounds mysterious. You should investigate.

It's probably the fault of some old guy who dresses as a monster or ghost and who'll get away with it if us meddling kids don't stop him.

I'll grab the Scooby Snacks.

Novella versus Novellette (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47720953)

What's the difference?
That's like having an award for "best short story" and "best short short story"

inbelievable (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721067)

this stuff is appalling !!!!!!!!!!

You cant make much writing Science Fiction (1)

InterGuru (50986) | about 3 months ago | (#47721081)

Sad thing. After Paolo Bacigalupi won all the awards below he discovered that you make much writing SF, and now writes Young Adult novels

The Windup Girl is a biopunk science fiction novel, written by Paolo Bacigalupi and published by Night Shade Books on September 1, 2009. The novel was named as the ninth best fiction book of 2009 by TIME magazine,[1] and as the best science fiction book of the year in the Reference and User Services Association's 2010 Reading List.[2] This book is a 2010 Nebula Award[3] and a 2010 Hugo Award winner (tied with The City & the City by China Miéville for the Hugo Award), both for best novel.[4] This book also won the 2010 Compton Crook Award and the 2010 Locus Award for best first novel.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

It's a great book, one of the best I have read for years. Its plusible dystopian take on the near future still haunts me.

Re:You cant make much writing Science Fiction (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 3 months ago | (#47721817)

It's different. Although one of the things that's a little annoying is that while he implies that a lot of the damage to the world's food supplies may be deliberate and ongoing, he never has anyone actually say that or even grumble, accuse or try and fight back. The closest approximation is where Thailand isolates itself and does internal purges.

The kink-spring concept is original, but nobody seems to have a clue about other renewable energy sources. He apparently never saw the YouTube video where someone took the fresnel lens out of an old flat-screen TV and used it to smelt metal. You could probably refine silicon for solar cells that way. Then again, since everybody seems to be running on the ragged edge, maybe they just can't spare the extra effort.

The real winner would appear to be tor.com... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47721615)

... who published all three of the short-form stories, and additionally one of their editors (Ellen Datlow) won Best Editor (short form). Congrats to everyone over there (I know at least some of you read /. :) )

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?